HSCB – A rebel bank with a cause

Artists and film-makers Hilary Powell and Dan Edelstyn took over a co-op bank to enact community driven debt relief, by the people for the people, in a bid to educate the public about how money and credit are actually created. And instead of putting the Queen on their money, they are making heroes out of the Garys, Sarahs, Tracys and Steves who are fighting for economic justice amid the fallout of the current system we are forced to live under.

RBS: the Hillsborough of British Business

If we were to tell you that you are a shareholder in a British bank you might be surprised. If we were to mention that that bank has been consistently running at a loss for a decade you may begin to worry about your investment. If we then said the organisation you’re invested in is accused of asset stripping compromised businesses to make a quick buck you probably wouldn’t believe us. Joining us to discuss RBS’ recent return to profit and whether it is now going to repay the British taxpayers is businessman, RBS victim and former CEO of Torex Retail PLC, Neil Mitchell.

Who are the real Olympic winners?

The sales pitch that is always used when bidding for the Olympics is that the legacy of the games will regenerate a part of the host country. This sounds wonderful in theory but in practice is the best policy for urban renewal to pay for expensive custom built sporting venues that are only used a handful of times? If not, we ask: who are the real Olympic winners?

The business of common sense

A cursory glance around the business world globally and you can tell that all is not well. Systems are broken. Bureaucracy is running riot. Management frequently does more harm than good. And despite the constant chat about culture, you can often find more culture in a pot of yoghurt. So as businesses begin to acknowledge how disengaged staff really are. We ask. How do you now build a business, an organisation that people genuinely want to work for?

Question everything

In a sensationalist world that operates at breakneck speed, many of us get caught careering between stimulus and response, rarely stopping to think critically about why we do what we do. More fundamentally, with nationalism on the rise, we ask: can philosophy enable us to think differently about our true identity? Stine Jensen is a Danish philosopher who lives in the Netherlands, a country and people that are not afraid of big or new ideas. We went there to meet her to find out about the importance philosophy has in our modern distracted world. We also wanted to know if Plato was right. Is the unexamined life really not worth living?

Event: How Economics Professors can stop failing us

Steve Payson, an US economics practictioner of long standing, will talk about his book ‘How Economics Professors Can Stop Failing us’ which provides an eye-opening expose on economics professors that will surely shock anyone who is not familiar with the topic, and even some of those who are familiar with it. Ellen Quigley has recently completed her research into economics education in the UK and will provide a perspective on our local profession.

The fiery ‘logic’ of James O’Brien

James O’Brien is a broadcaster and also one of the landlord’s of the British moral high ground. His notorious rants are self-assured but sometimes light on logic. See below to try and get into the mind of the broadcaster when giving his opinions about Russia and Western liberal democracy… Some of the reasoning may give you an ice cream headache.

The great British train robbery

Privatising British Railways was meant to bring innovation, efficiency, competition and therefore lower fares but the reality, well it’s been very different. The former British Prime Minister and devout neo liberal Margaret Thatcher was in favour of mass privatisation but even she claimed that privatising the British Rail System was ‘a privatisation too far’ but this didn’t stop her successors. So on this program we ask. Was the neoliberal dream of rail privatisation actually the great British train robbery?

Poverty porn: divide, fool, rule

For many years the British tabloid press has had a monopoly on how the working class perceives themselves and their communities. But tabloid power is waning, creating an opportunity to tell a different story. One that’s more human and intricate. Not designed to divide, fool and rule. Joining us to work out if we are wiser to media manipulation or complicit in it are Aaron Reeves, associate professorial research fellow at the International inequalities Institute at the London School of Economics and Dr James Alan Anslow a writer and researcher in depth psychology, and former tabloid journalist.

Child services fit for the 21st Century

In our first program with Camila Batmanghelidjh, we focused on the closure of her charity, Kids Company. In this program we discuss with her what 21st century children’s services should actually look like. Over the last 20 years, Kids Company partnered with scientists to examine what was happening to children’s brains as a result of chronic maltreatment and neglect. They found that the brain function of traumatised children was similar to that of war-veterans, except their war was surviving childhood in the ghettos of Britain.

Digital is killing democracy

When talking about the internet, we like to assume it is a powerful utility that enhances democracy. But instead of improving our understanding and informing our political choices, social networks and social media actually narrows the debate and closes down free speech. Electorates across the world are being manipulated by tech monopolies that are collating our data and using it to appeal to our prejudices. In short, digital is killing democracy. We went to the Netherlands to meet André Krouwel, a political scientist who thinks differently about the power and influence of social media.

Digital is killing democracy: teaser

Coming up this week, we talk to political scientist, André Krouwel about the revolution the internet has failed to bring about, and how inequality is being exacerbated by our tax systems. Tune into Renegade Inc. on RTUK, on Monday the 5th of February at 7.30am, 1.30pm, and 6.30pm, or stay glued to the website for upcoming episodes.

Profits or policing?

One thing Theresa May will be remembered for is her treatment of the British police. As Home Secretary, Mrs May brutally cut more than a fifth of all funding to police forces. The unofficial dictat was that the police should do more with less, a mystifying statement that almost guarantees a demoralised and thus compliant workforce. So is this what she wanted? Or was there another motive to this act? A political move maybe, that would begin the privatisation of Britain’s police force.

Neoliberalism: The force isn’t with you…

Paul Verhaeghe, professor of clinical psychology and psychoanalysis, claims we live in an extremely controlling society, where authority has all but disappeared, lapsing into brute force. He says the neoliberal economic order has changed us for the worse, that change cannot be left to the so-called ‘free market’, and that we ourselves must take the first steps towards creating a new social order.

Universal Basic Income – Utopian or Real?

Universal Basic Income (UBI) is one of those ideas that has divided public opinion into two opposing camps: Those who think it would result in disaster, as humans cannot be trusted. The other camp feels that a UBI would be liberating, allowing people to concentrate on the important things in life, not just earning a living. Rutger Bregman is a writer, widely acclaimed for his book, Utopia for Realists. In it, he champions Universal Basic Income and a 15 hour work week. So, we went to the Netherlands to ask him if the time for these ideas has arrived.