None so blind as those who will not see

There is no other way to describe economics in 2017 than wilful blindness, writes economist Professor Steven Keen.  Nobel Laureates who claimed financial crises were now impossible also claimed the 2008 Global Financial Crisis could not have been predicted. This is all, of course, nonsense. The evidence was there all along. Those with the power to change the course of history simply chose to ignore it.

The insidious nature of power

Our problems will not be solved by the victory of one party over another, or of one ‘ism’ over another. Changing lawmakers from ‘conservatives’ to ‘liberals’ or ‘liberals’ to ‘socialists’, without reforming how the laws are made is like asking the orchestra to play a happy tune whilst the ship goes down, writes Mark GB. Our problems arise from the centralisation of power and money in the hands of unaccountable vested interests. We need fundamental reform of the political and monetary system itself.

Central banks: a sausage based conundrum

They say if you like laws and sausages, you should never watch either one being made. Banking belongs on that list also, but it seems most people would rather not know. Economic conditions are poor. We are not in a recovery; we are in a depression. Central Banks don’t understand the problem because central banks are the problem.