Big bad Vlad: the demonisation of Russia

The barrage of scaremongering by the British press before the football World Cup, painted the hosts Russia as a tyrannical country unsafe for tourists and football fans alike. But the reality has been very different. Visitors have taken to social media to explain that they’ve found Russia and her people hospitable and friendly. This wasn’t what they were told to expect. So was this media onslaught just a mistake? Or was this the latest instalment of post Cold War rhetoric designed to malign Russia? With relations between the West and Russia at an all time low, where next for this relationship? Joining us to discuss why both sides are locked in this frozen conflict is the writer and broadcaster, John White.

A war criminal in the White House

Kissinger is estimated to be responsible for at least four million deaths worldwide. During his legacy, he expanded US arms sales whilst conducting covert operations via the CIA. He sabotaged civil liberation movements, armed mercenaries and apartheid forces. So why is he a regular entry on Trump’s White House visitors list? Claire Connelly looks into the direction of future US foreign policy.

The politics behind ‘Russiagate’

From the unsubstantiated assertions that Putin fixed the US election, the fake claims of Russian hacking, the hysterical and baseless claims of Facebook ads paid for by the Kremlin, Washington’s banning of RT and Sputnik ads and Theresa May’s speech calling Russia a threat to Western civilisation, the attempts to demonise Russia and Vladimir Putin have taken a sinister, McCarthy-ite turn.

Right to Left: UK foreign policy on Syria follows an historical pattern

From the colonial-imperial wars of the early 19th century through to the 1950s in Syria and the early 1980s in Afghanistan and beyond, the objectives of the Western powers has always been the same – the drive for profits. In which we critique the role both the Right and the Left in Britain have, and are, playing in the propaganda process. Has there ever been an ethical dimension in relation to UK foreign policy in Syria and elsewhere?

NATO itching for war with Russia

NATO wants Europe to upgrade its roads, bridges and rail networks. Not because of dilapidated infrastructure, or to make it easier for people to travel across the continent – let alone their own countries – but so they can handle the weight of its heavy tanks and military equipment for what it deems an inevitable invasion of Russia. Though it has yet to commit a single crime, up to 10,000 NATO troops have amassed on Russia’s border states, in lieu of a war that hasn’t happened yet.