The student debt bomb

Out of all the arguments and excuses that people manufacture to justify the financialisation of society, the most difficult one to accept is that creating a market in education is the only way it can be funded. This view becomes even harder to justify when it is promoted by a generation of people who benefited from free further education. As many of that generation are now drawing their triple-lock pensions, a younger generation of students are being lumbered with eye-watering amounts of debt, which begs a very simple question: why have British politicians turned the classroom into an asset class?

Are the Kids Alright?

The days of the job for life, gold watch and a long and comfortable retirement are long gone. Ironically, today’s Western curriculum, which has barely changed for a century, continues to prepare pupils for a standardized world. How does a stagnating education system reinvent itself to equip students to solve new problems and prepare them for a workplace that doesn’t yet exist? Ross Ashcroft is joined by the chief executive of the Chartered College of Teaching, Professor Dame Alison Peacock, and educator and writer Graham Brown-Martin.

Fish through the net – my experience as a black student in Oxford

Data obtained under the Freedom of Information Act revealed that only 10 out of 32 Oxford University Colleges awarded a place to a black British pupil with A-Levels in 2015. Over six-years, Oriel College offered only one place to a black student. One of Oxford’s only black students, Otis Clarke, says though it has the best of intentions, Oxford still does not possess the cultural nuance to foster true diversity across its student body. If its colleges are not institutions of “social apartheid” Oxford must be fully committed to social progress for such a culture to flourish.