The global economy: What lies beneath

Ten years after the great financial crisis, markets are again booming, but as are levels of debt and leverage. Is this a cause for concern or have policymakers fixed the fundamentals? Has complacency lead investors to take on greater risks or have they learnt the lessons of 2008? Is Brexit a blip as the Eurozone is actually in rude health? Or are the fault lines increasingly clear but papered over? As volatility returns to markets. We ask: what lies beneath the global economy? Joining us to work out what is really going on in the markets and the wider global economy, is investor, hedge fund manager and author of Planet Ponzi, Mitch Feierstein.

Globalisation 2.0 & the Rise of the East

The West has dominated globalisation to date, but that balance of power is shifting and it’s happening much faster than Western leaders are willing to accept, as new countries demand a seat at the table. The global pecking order is rebalancing to get a broader view on the risks and opportunities in this new global economy. We traveled to Southeast Asia to meet former World Bank economist, Dr Kirida Bhaopichitr. We began by talking about the unstoppable rise of the East, the problem with protectionism in the West, and the inevitability of a multipolar world.

How economics professors can stop failing us

Many students today continue to be deceived by their professors who, even after the great financial crisis, still teach a fantasy, or other worldly version of economics. So on this program we ask: How do we begin to reverse a heavily entrenched education system that manufactures economists that have such a detrimental effect on wider society? Joining us to discuss how academics are failing us: renegade economist, Professor Steve Keen, and author and economist, Dr Steven Payson.

Socialism for the rich

The principal objective of the UK tax system, in which the poor pay a higher proportion of tax than the rich, is not to improve the collective well-being of society, but to funnel cash – largely through tax cuts – to the corporate elite. This isn’t free-market capitalism in the formal sense, but socialism for the rich – a form of state capitalism – no different in principle to the old statist economies of the former Soviet Union.