Why capitalism is safer in Corbyn’s hands

You know there’s something deeply wrong with the state of the global economy when American venture capitalist, Nick Hanauer, reaches consensus with Jeremy Corbyn, that if capitalism doesn’t change fundamentally, it will destroy itself. 

The elites are carving up our cities

The creation of major asset bubbles exemplified by the rising costs of housing, is a consequence of deliberate Tory government policy geared towards satisfying the asset diversification needs of the super rich rather than meeting the human need for homes for ordinary people to live in. In other words, the key motivating factor shaping government housing policy is not to end the housing crisis, but to bolster the investment opportunities of the rich which will make it worse.

Gods and monsters

Western liberal democracies may emphasise the separation of church and state, but in practice their attempts to control the population are similar to the pre-Enlightenment days where human nature was seen as unchanging, private property ‘natural’, and the power of Kings a fixed, grand purpose designed and ordained by God. Much like the industrial revolution resulted in a grand transfer of power from feudal landlords to corporate grandees, it is unlikely that the establishment will be able to control the forces which Corbynism has unleashed.

Technology is not a supplement for social policy

Social problems cannot be hacked. The popularisation of ‘Hack Days’ is simply the privatisation of poverty. Technology will never be a supplement for good government. Around the world, elected leaders have abdicated their responsibility for their citizens to the private sector. The only thing worth hacking are parties themselves.

The student debt bomb

Out of all the arguments and excuses that people manufacture to justify the financialisation of society, the most difficult one to accept is that creating a market in education is the only way it can be funded. This view becomes even harder to justify when it is promoted by a generation of people who benefited from free further education. As many of that generation are now drawing their triple-lock pensions, a younger generation of students are being lumbered with eye-watering amounts of debt, which begs a very simple question: why have British politicians turned the classroom into an asset class?