Why have wages been allowed to stagnate?

People in minimum wage jobs today are doing much worse, relative to the well-off, than they were 50 years ago. Recently, one of our readers wrote in to ask us to explain why minimum wage rates have been allowed to stagnate. Steven Hail delves deeper and shares a few reasons why…

Corruption begins at home

Bribery and corruption is an inherent and unfortunate part of big business deal-making across the developed and developing world.  But the idea that the Western corporate media would present domestic and foreign corruption as the same is unthinkable. Instead, viewers of the BBC are conveniently invited to vent their anger towards black politicians in far away places.

Amazon: hail the corporate overlord

Amazon is looking for a new home and has put the word out for the almighty “market” to provide. The tech giant has made entire cities complicit in the race to the bottom with promises of tax cuts and other financial incentives – bribes. It is not only looking for a host city, but a partner which can further its monopolistic plans. Myopic cash strapped cities are happy to oblige mistaking this extortion for opportunity.

Deus ex Mueller isn’t coming

Dear America. Stop trying to make Russiagate happen. It’s not going to happen. Deus ex Mueller isn’t coming. You’re going to have to solve your country’s problems yourselves, America. He may dig up evidence of corruption, but Robert Mueller’s investigation will never – ever – find proof that Trump colluded with Russia to steal the 2016 election using hackers and propaganda. If you attribute all your problems to Trump, you’re guaranteeing more Trumps after him, because you’re not addressing the disease which created him, you’re just addressing the symptom. 

Bailiff Britain

The privatisation of debt collection in Britain has resulted in a boom for the bailiff industry of such massive proportions it would make Al Capone blush. Over 300 UK local authorities outsourced their debt collection to private bailiffs in 2014-15. More than two million debt collection referrals took place over that 12-month period, which works out to more than six new debt enforcement instructions every minute. This is why the industry is seeing double digit growth year-on-year. But at what social cost?