The Grandparents of Brexit

It is by far the most emotive and divisive issue of a generation: Brexit has split families, ended relationships, derailed political careers and divided a country. But was the outcome of the EU referendum on the 23rd of June 2016 a rash, knee jerk decision, or had anti-EU feeling been building for many years? If Brexit was a long time in the making, we ask: Who were the real grandparents of Brexit?

Can the welfare state be saved on its 70th birthday?

NHS was established on the basis that there should be free medical care to the entire population. Back in 1948, it was the first such scheme in any Western country, funded by the taxpayer and from no other source. But now the NHS is a euphemism for privatisation, cuts to services and the retrenchment of benefits. So what has happened?

How economics professors can stop failing us

Many students today continue to be deceived by their professors who, even after the great financial crisis, still teach a fantasy, or other worldly version of economics. So on this program we ask: How do we begin to reverse a heavily entrenched education system that manufactures economists that have such a detrimental effect on wider society? Joining us to discuss how academics are failing us: renegade economist, Professor Steve Keen, and author and economist, Dr Steven Payson.

Syria: neoliberalism vs sovereignty

The more we hear about Syria, the less we understand. The mixed messages that come from the media seem only to add more confusion. Having been hoodwinked into wars in the Middle East before, the British people are naturally skeptical. So beyond the headlines what’s the real geopolitical play that’s going on and why is it occurring? We travelled to Singapore to meet Professor Ali Kadri, a Middle Eastern economist who understands the geopolitical play and gives us an unvarnished look into what’s at stake, the forces driving the Syrian conflict, and the wider problems across the Middle East.