Havana: city of dreams underpinned by harsh socioeconomic realities

Havana is a city of dreamers and dreams; of myths and fantasies, where “anything is possible”. But it is also a city that cannot escape a present guided by the dark forces of its past. In essence, Havana is a contradiction that represents the antithesis of the kind of nightmares imposed on it by its superpower adversary 90 miles away.

Socialism for the rich

The principal objective of the UK tax system, in which the poor pay a higher proportion of tax than the rich, is not to improve the collective well-being of society, but to funnel cash – largely through tax cuts – to the corporate elite. This isn’t free-market capitalism in the formal sense, but socialism for the rich – a form of state capitalism – no different in principle to the old statist economies of the former Soviet Union.

He died for our debts, not our sins

As we turn towards our faiths this Christmas and Hanukkah in an attempt to make sense of the year that was, economist Professor Michael Hudson says we have been interpreting the bible incorrectly. And he has written an entire book about it. Rather than sex and sin, both Christianity and Judaism is preoccupied with debt. As it turns out, Jesus was a socialist activist who paid the ultimate price, fighting for the reinstatement of regular debt jubilees. In fact, the rulers of classical antiquity who cancelled their subjects’ debts were overthrown with disturbing frequency and tended not to live that long…

J is for Junk Economics

“Economics has failed,” is a phrase that is becoming more common by the day, the result of the current economic paradigm of neoliberalism. But economist, Professor Michael Hudson says economics has not failed it all. It is working perfectly well, according to the rules upon which it has been set. On this week’s episode of Renegade Inc, we explore the cover story of neoliberal economics.

The insidious nature of power

Our problems will not be solved by the victory of one party over another, or of one ‘ism’ over another. Changing lawmakers from ‘conservatives’ to ‘liberals’ or ‘liberals’ to ‘socialists’, without reforming how the laws are made is like asking the orchestra to play a happy tune whilst the ship goes down, writes Mark GB. Our problems arise from the centralisation of power and money in the hands of unaccountable vested interests. We need fundamental reform of the political and monetary system itself.