Profits or policing?

One thing Theresa May will be remembered for is her treatment of the British police. As Home Secretary, Mrs May brutally cut more than a fifth of all funding to police forces. The unofficial dictat was that the police should do more with less, a mystifying statement that almost guarantees a demoralised and thus compliant workforce. So is this what she wanted? Or was there another motive to this act? A political move maybe, that would begin the privatisation of Britain’s police force.

The elites are carving up our cities

The creation of major asset bubbles exemplified by the rising costs of housing, is a consequence of deliberate Tory government policy geared towards satisfying the asset diversification needs of the super rich rather than meeting the human need for homes for ordinary people to live in. In other words, the key motivating factor shaping government housing policy is not to end the housing crisis, but to bolster the investment opportunities of the rich which will make it worse.

The student debt bomb

Out of all the arguments and excuses that people manufacture to justify the financialisation of society, the most difficult one to accept is that creating a market in education is the only way it can be funded. This view becomes even harder to justify when it is promoted by a generation of people who benefited from free further education. As many of that generation are now drawing their triple-lock pensions, a younger generation of students are being lumbered with eye-watering amounts of debt, which begs a very simple question: why have British politicians turned the classroom into an asset class?

Right to Left: UK foreign policy on Syria follows an historical pattern

From the colonial-imperial wars of the early 19th century through to the 1950s in Syria and the early 1980s in Afghanistan and beyond, the objectives of the Western powers has always been the same – the drive for profits. In which we critique the role both the Right and the Left in Britain have, and are, playing in the propaganda process. Has there ever been an ethical dimension in relation to UK foreign policy in Syria and elsewhere?

Bean counters: Lost in Paradise

Long before the Paradise Papers, or the Panama Papers, the Enron scandal, Savings and Loan crisis, WorldCom, and the Global Financial Crisis, governments in the US, UK and Australia were colluding with the world’s biggest banks and their clients using aggressions dynamics not to defeat but to suborn the controls of the supposedly independent professionals: The accountants.