None so blind as those who will not see

There is no other way to describe economics in 2017 than wilful blindness, writes economist Professor Steven Keen.  Nobel Laureates who claimed financial crises were now impossible also claimed the 2008 Global Financial Crisis could not have been predicted. This is all, of course, nonsense. The evidence was there all along. Those with the power to change the course of history simply chose to ignore it.

Fake abundance

The British economy is not ok. But you wouldn’t know it by looking around you. Luxury cars. Designer clothing. And banks chomping at the bit to lend people even more money. Ex-pat photographer and designer, Adrian Scoffham describes his return to the land of ‘fake abundance’.

The end of the indispensable empire

The challenge facing the US is to operate in a world where there is not one single power, but multiple poles of power and influence. If you were Russia, or China, or Iran, would you believe that the American administration has any interest whatsoever in international law? Would you trust the US? Or would you be looking over your shoulder wondering if you were next?

Balanced budget ‘like shooting the economy in the head’ – experts

Treating federal budgets like that of a household has starved economies of precious resources and has facilitated unprecedented levels of private and household debt. Editor-in-chief Claire Connelly explores the consequence of this logical fallacy in an excerpt of her upcoming book, How The World Really Doesn’t Work.