The state of the UK

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An old friend of mine sent me a message a few days ago after reading ‘The Insidious Nature of Power‘, a piece I wrote for Renegade Inc. in September 2017 here. “I would love it if you did some analysis from a UK standpoint. What do you think of where we are on Brexit? Do you think the […]

The not-so-free press

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George Orwell famously said journalism is printing what someone else does not want printed. Everything else is public relations. In a world festooned with PR exercises and reputation management, was Mr Orwell overly cynical, or was he well ahead of his time? With print media’s business model in free fall, newspaper proprietors are increasingly desperate to find ways to ensure financial viability. The problem with this approach is that corporate interests can and often do trump the interests of readers. Joining us to discuss how free the UK press really is are the lecturer in journalism and media studies at Birkbeck College, Justin Schlosberg, and the editor of Open Media at openDemocracy, James Cusick.

Empire of things

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When we talk about consumerism, the emotive arguments for and against are always black and white. Consumerism is painted as unnecessary and low or no growth is seen as the optimum state for people and planet. But what if acquiring objects and possessions is intrinsic to human nature? What if, in reality, the consumerism argument is far more nuanced, which should make us rethink how we spend, what we buy and which things are most important to us. Joining us to work out where next for consumer spending and give historical context to the rampant consumerism we seem to love is the author of ‘The Empire of Things’, Professor Frank Trentmann.

Resilience: Building students to think for themselves

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Whenever world class education systems are highlighted, Singapore is always vaunted as a leading light internationally. Their system reliably produces students with good discipline, a ferocious work ethic and good grades. But what if these measurements have been useful but one dimensional? Especially now the world and the workplace have changed? What if the glorification of the academic individual only goes so far and actually service to your community or nation is more useful?

Grenfell: woven into the fabric of the UK

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When it comes to housing, politicians don’t have a genuine desire to improve the quality of life for ordinary people but help sustain the fractional reserve banking racket and to perpetuate asset bubbles.

Attacks in lieu of answers

Attacks in lieu of answers

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It is incredibly destabilising when the news networks you know and trust turn on their audiences. It’s either ofcom investigations, media hit pieces or the good old label of ‘conspiracy theorist’ for anyone with the audacity to question the dominant narrative. Shouldn’t that be the job of the media in the first place?

Class Matters

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Class…it’s something quite subjective. But do we now judge social class through someone’s lifestyle choices and job roles, rather than their relationship to the means of production? Daniel Margrain unlocks the subtle, but important, change.

Not in Corbyn’s name and certainly not in mine

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The establishment is coming for Jeremy Corbyn. That it needed to dredge up a two-year-old story about a damn mural demonstrates their desperation and the lengths it – and its media allies will go to – to prevent an anti-war party leader from assuming power.