Cracked and how not to run a media company

Cracked quietly laid off its entire video production team and most of its staff over the Christmas break, taking its core product with it, along with the writers, actors and personalities that made it famous in the first place. If it still expects to profit on margins, it’s in for a rude shock. Why would its key audience return to the site, knowing it has been stripped for its parts? These job losses are a cautionary tale for how not to run a media company. Its lessons apply as much to founders as investors.

Too much news

It used to be that news was more or less the reporting of interactions that were geopolitical in scale. These days, news stories break at the speed of a president’s pudgy little bigot-fingers.  Newspapers are complicit in acquiescing to the chaos of Trump’s presidency by keeping us at tweet’s length from a deeper understanding of this new, terrifying White House. One could almost argue that it’s never been more important for newspapers to avoid reporting the news, and instead tell us what’s actually going on.

We don’t have a fake news problem, we have a reality problem

If the marriage between technology and the democratisation of information was meant to liberate the world, freedom has come at a strange cost: our perception of reality. Everything is a lie. Nothing is real. Behavioural economist, Nicole Matejic examines what happens when reality starts to feel like bizarro-world.